First Tier 1 Cannabis Small Grower License Issued in Vermont

Rutland Craft Cannabis LTD. received the first-ever Level 1 Small Grower License from the State of Vermont. While the Cannabis Control Board currently has 179 cultivator applications, there is a reason, in part, why Rutland Craft Cannabis LTD. was the first to obtain a license. “We started, of course, with these requests from people from communities that have been disproportionately impacted by cannabis prohibition,” said James Pepper, chairman of the Vermont Cannabis Control Board. The Vermont legislature wants the Cannabis Control Commission to prioritize social equity claims submitted by people disproportionately targeted by cannabis prohibition. They also want priority given to businesses owned by women and minority groups. According to the Board of Directors, Rutland Craft Cannabis LTD. owned by Hispanic Americans. “This bill has been vetoed several times. So, you know, this is a big deal for the advocacy community that is calling for more sensible drug policies. Particularly around cannabis for a very long time,” Pepper said. Economists hired by the council said 450,000 to 500,000 square feet of canopy, where cannabis is grown, are needed to meet demand. The council tries to achieve this goal by licensing small growers like Rutland Craft Cannabis LTD. first, which will manage 1,000 square feet of indoor grow space. It’s a decision supported by cannabis equity advocacy groups like NORML. “What we want to try to avoid is having the conglomeration of power. And putting the concentration of power in the hands of small producers, social equity business owners and ordinary people,” said Nick Scheurmann, executive director of NORML. The non-profit organization said more needs to be done to bring fairness to delivery standards in the future before conglomerates can take over. This is legislation that we will be introducing in January that would develop a delivery license that would be available exclusively to qualified social equity seekers This would involve delivering cannabis to the retailer to the adult user or from the retailer to the patient,” Scheurmann said. The Cannabis Control Board expects demand to outstrip supply when cannabis stores begin to be licensed and open after Oct. 1. He said he will It takes time to build the supply chain and officials want to prioritize smallholder farmers as much as possible.

Rutland Craft Cannabis LTD. received the first-ever Level 1 Small Grower License from the State of Vermont.

Although the Cannabis Control Board currently has 179 cultivator applications, there is a reason, in part, why Rutland Craft Cannabis LTD. was the first to obtain a license.

“We started, of course, with these requests from people from communities that have been disproportionately impacted by cannabis prohibition,” said James Pepper, chairman of the Vermont Cannabis Control Board.

The Vermont legislature wants the Cannabis Control Commission to prioritize social equity claims submitted by people disproportionately targeted by cannabis prohibition. They also want priority given to women-owned businesses and minority groups.

According to the board, Rutland Craft Cannabis LTD. owned by Hispanic Americans.

“This bill has been vetoed several times. So, you know, this is a big deal for the advocacy community that is calling for more sensible drug policies. Particularly around cannabis for a very long time,” Pepper said.

Economists hired by the council said 450,000 to 500,000 square feet of canopy, where cannabis is grown, are needed to meet demand.

The council tries to achieve this goal by allowing small growers like Rutland Craft Cannabis LTD. first, which will manage 1,000 square feet of indoor grow space.
It’s a decision supported by cannabis equity advocacy groups like NORML.

“What we want to try to avoid is having the conglomeration of power. And putting the concentration of power in the hands of small producers, social equity business owners and ordinary people,” said Nick Scheurmann, Executive Director of NORML.

The nonprofit said more needs to be done to bring fairness to delivery standards in the future before conglomerates can take over.

“This is legislation that we will introduce in January that would develop a delivery license that would be available exclusively to qualified social equity seekers. It would be delivering cannabis from the retailer to the adult user or from the retailer to the patient,” Scheurmann said.

The Cannabis Control Council predicts that demand will exceed supply when cannabis stores begin to be licensed and open after October 1. He said it takes time to build the supply chain and officials want to prioritize smallholder farmers as much as possible.

Milton S. Rodgers